Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Glenn Greenwald
Journalist, lawyer, columnist, Blogger, author
ALJAZAM 01/30/2014
Greenwald: He (Snowden) has brought to light enormous amounts of lying on the part of high level government officials, unconstitutional and other legal forms of surveillance. MacVicar: After the leaks, The Privacy and Civil Liberties Board investigated the NSA’s collection of phone data and concluded, “The government should end it’s 215 bulk telephone records program.” MacVicar: And last month a U.S. district judge ruled that the collection of U.S. domestic telephone records was “probably unconstitutional.” Greenwald: Only real check on abuses of power is if we the public know what they are doing. And that’s why it was so imperative that Mr. Snowden came forward and shined a light on these things. MacVicar: Snowden remains in exile without a U.S. passport, facing espionage charges here.
James Bamford
Author and Journalist, Writer for Wired
ALJAZAM 01/30/2014
MacVicar: For some, he is a traitor, who should be punished for the damage he has done to U.S. national security. For others, he is a patriotic whistleblower who revealed government excesses. Bamford: Well I think there is a big push to get him pardoned. I think a lot of people think he's a hero for what he did. I think he's a courageous whistleblower. I don’t think there’s any indication that he's a traitor, that he sold secrets to a foreign government secretly to make a lot of money.
Barack Obama
President
ALJAZAM 01/30/2014
MacVicar: Edward Snowden traitor or patriot, started an important national conversation about government intrusion and surveillance, a conversation that resulted in promises of new eyes on the watchers. Obama: I will reform our surveillance programs because the vital work of our intelligence depends on public confidence here and abroad. The privacy of ordinarily people is not being violated.
Baard Vegar Solhjell and Snorre Valen
Norway's Former Environment Minister and Former Representative of The Nowegian Parliament
ALJAZAM 01/30/2014
Obama: I will reform our surveillance programs because the vital work of intelligence depends on public confidence here and abroad. The privacy of ordinarily people is not being violated. MacVicar: it will take a lot to convince some people of that. But as the two Norwegian legislators who nominated Edward Snowden for the Nobel Peace Prize said we do not necessarily condone or support all of his disclosures. We are however convinced that the public debate and changes in policy have contributed to a more stable and peaceful world order. His actions have in fact led to the reintroduction of trust and transparency as a leading principle, they said, in global security policies. Its value cannot be overestimated.
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